Sitting…Waiting…Writing…

This is a post dedicated to a friend and coworker who’s thinking about writing a blog.

 

I’ve always thought of golf as a series of significant steps in a direction without a destination. I’ll give you a semi-practical example: the first time you break 100, you set a goal to shoot 90, then to break 90, then to shoot 80, then break 80, and so on. You just keep going. It’s a grind, but it’s very Zen-like.

I’ve thought a lot about golf — now, every once in a while, I put my thoughts down on blog — and, since I’m waiting for my new clubs to get here, I think I’ll take a few minutes to remember the clubs I’ve carried over the years.

 

Dunlop’s

I got my first set of real clubs in 8th grade. They were good. Very solid. I broke 90 with those clubs at Cleveland Country Club (what used to be Kirbywood Golf Club, now this). I used them until my junior year. When I got my next set, my dad took the Dunlops.

 

Titleist DCI Oversize + Gold

When I first hit the Titleists, the ball flew off the club-face. It was like nothing I’d ever hit before. The guy at Golfsmith recommended them because, at the time, they were some of the most forgiving yet reasonably priced golf clubs on the market. Plus, they were Titleists — very popular among the pros.

I broke 80 with those clubs my junior year. I shot 79. I worked my tail off for that 79, by the way; harder than I ever had before. I remember hitting a pretty decent drive down the right at Cleveland Country Club (correct, the one from before) and hit a really weak lay-up with a seven-iron. Then a nine-iron into the green for a pretty basic two putt.

I used those irons into college, much to my chagrin. Toward the end, I couldn’t make a connection with the long irons. When I finally snapped the 7-iron at the grip after getting really upset with its apparent lack of consistency, it was time to move in a different direction.

 

Ping ISI-S

My teammate and friend in college let me borrow his set of Pings one day while I was getting frustrated on the range with my Titleists. I was fighting a slice from the pits of hell. Every shot brought me closer and closer to self-immolation. The Pings felt a little shallower so I compensated by swinging a bit more from the inside — dropped my right elbow to pull the club down. Thinking about it now, I could have done all of that with my Titleists and probably would have had the same results. But, man, I was desperate. The first several swings felt great, the ball was in the air and not screaming to the right after slowly dragging through the air for 90 yards.

I played a round and hit a lot of greens that I was aiming at — I was immediately hooked. Eventually the flight straightened out and I was able to get some distance back that was severely lacking.

Well, my friend moved back to Sweden and he took his irons with him. It was a sad time, not only because I haven’t seen my friend for years but because those irons saved my game.

 

Hogan blades

Immediately following my Pings, I switched to the next logical step in my progression to a more forgiving iron — Hogans.

They felt great for a while, I was finally gaining weight so I was able to put a little extra oomph behind the ball, and, frankly, what else was I going to do?

 

1994 Callaway Big Berthas

Eventually, reality sets in, and the clubs that got me through that second year of college golf, along with countless rounds between Texas and DC, weren’t cutting the mustard anymore. I needed something cheap and easy to hit. I discovered a website that gave me both.

I always coveted the Berthas. Colin Montgomerie, still one of my favorite players, hit ‘em. Annika Sorenstam hit ‘em. And Jim Colbert hit ‘em. Why wouldn’t you want them?

I’ve been playing with those since 2007. They’ve been good to me. But, times are changing. I’m getting older. And the swing isn’t what it used to be.

 

Cobra Baffler Irons

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My first club

My first golf club was a “Medalist” 7-iron that my grandfather cut down to a reasonable length for me when I was a kid. I don’t know how old I was. I don’t know how well I hit the ball. But, I remember spending time with my dad out at Packsaddle Golf Course (now Lighthouse Country Club) hitting the ball. It was the best gift I’ve ever been given.

What did I learn last weekend?

That I’m a bad listener.

I played 9 holes with some friends this weekend. We reserved two tee-times for eight folks. Three of them have never played golf before. Two of them, my old roommates, had played before but didn’t get out hardly at all.

Sounds like a disaster, right? But not in the way you think.

I was astonished at how well my former roommates played. Astonished, mostly, because I had no idea that they played golf! One of the women seriously ripped at the ball — taking divots off the fairway — beating down 200 yard drives. The other had a short game that many 15 handicappers would die for. We played a scramble and we used a good number of their shots.

I lived with them for two years and didn’t know that they play golf…and do it well. Why didn’t I ever ask?

To tell you the truth, I was so much blown away by their ability, I could hardly concentrate on the fact that my other friend, the beginner, was asking me for help.

Just hit the ball,” I would say, like a complete asshole.

When was golf ever that simple? As just hitting the ball?

She responded with, “It seems more complicated than that.”

She’s right. But, why didn’t I help her?

The next day, I was standing on the 14th tee box on East Potomac’s Blue Course looking down at my grip — I’ve added that to my pre-shot routine — and realized, “You jerk. Start with the grip!”

Had I taken a moment to show my friend how to grip the club, it would have made a huge difference for her. It would have led to taking a stance properly, keeping her head down. THEN HIT THE BALL.

And I would have thanked my old roommates for showing my friend how to hit the ball.

Next time, if I can.